Transportation_WhiteHouse_Bike_1886

Other Transportation Options

This post is a combined effort between Hannah Fischer and Claudia Guidi. Thanks to both!


In the previous post, we took at look a public transportation options in Washington, D.C. In this post, we will be taking a look at other transportation options for getting around Washington, D.C., including via bikes, taxis, ride sharing services — and even Segways and pedicabs!

Bicycles
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“Smartly dressed couple seated on an 1886-model bicycle for two,” United States National Archives, at https://goo.gl/c3X67N.

Biking can be a great way to see the city and avoid traffic jams at the same time. Washington, D.C. was the first U.S. jurisdiction to launch a bicycle sharing program in 2008. Since that time, the largest bike sharing program, now called Capital Bikeshare, has taken off, and the program is now owned by various local governments. Find out more about how it works, a station map, and pricing at its website.

You can also rent bicycles by the day (rather than by the half hour, as is the case with most Capitol Bikeshare rentals). BikeWashington.org has a list of resources to help you do that. In addition, guests at one of the conference hotels, the Capitol Hill Hotel, have access to that hotel’s own bike program.

No matter where you get your bicycle, you can turn to Washington D.C.’s Department of Transportation page to check for information on bike paths (as of 2015), bicycle and pedestrian safety, and bicycle laws.

The Washington Area Bicyclist Association also has information on bicycle routes, including apps that may help you find your preferred path. They also have pages on key points of bicycle laws in the area, biking visibly, and on what to do if your bike is stolen.

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“Bike race on Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C.,” Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Collection, at http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2011632658/.

Do you want to bring your bike onto Metro? Here are the rules for bringing your bike onto Metro rail and the rules for bringing your bike onto a Metro bus.

If you’re serious about biking and want to get out of the city, here is a webpage with the local longer-distance bike paths.

DC also offers many options for tours on buses, Segways, and even pedicabs, particularly in and around the National Mall area.

Taxis and Ride sharing Options
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“Heated Taxi Cab,” Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Collection, at http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/hec2013010061/.

Washington, D.C. also has many options for taxi and ride sharing services. The D.C. government Department of For-Hire Vehicles has this list of for-hire vehicles that can be dispatched either via phone or digitally via your smartphone. In addition, this AboutTravel.com page has information on taxis in D.C. (including pricing information).

Taxis in D.C. now mostly have a red-and-grey pattern; you are allowed to hail them from the street, and you should tip the driver at the end of the ride. By contrast, ride sharing vehicles will not have a standard look; they must be hailed using your smartphone device; and the tip is usually included in the price.

Let us know if you have any questions about transportation in the comment box below — or if there are any modes of transportation we didn’t cover that you would like to use (hot air balloons?).

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